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The Sagona, also the Greek


Built in 1912 by SB Dundee Ltd shipyard, the Sagona was 53.34 metres long, 8.62 metres wide and had a tonnage of 808 tons, which was the equivalent of a small freighter. On December 3, 1945, she hit a floating mine and sank within minutes with her bow torn off.

The depth :
Mini 35m - 47m max

L'accesssibilité :
NLevel 3.

The diving conditions :
Please note that there is often a strong current that can make diving dangerous and that there may be a lot of divers at certain times of the day.

The Dive :
The explosion had severed the front third of the ship. The stern part of the ship is the most intact and beautiful.
The ship stands upright on its keel, ¾ of the propeller sticking out of the sand at a depth of 47 m. The hull is covered with sea fans which have also invaded the passage ways, decorating them with beautiful colors.
The funnel remains standing at a depth of 36 m, although damaged. The structures of the stern are intact, covered with some kind of roof of which only the wire-mesh reinforcement still stands.

History :
The name of this ship comes from the Greek language: the wreck had been forgotten about for some time, and no one remembered her name anymore. When the Navy sent divers to explore her, they discovered Greek documents, and so they renamed her the Sagona. Since then the name has stuck. The ship is now better known as the Greek rather than as the Sagona